Archives

York’s history

New Earswick Primary School

In 1904, Joseph Rowntree set up the Joseph Rowntree Village Trust to manage the new housing development in New Earswick. The village included a ‘non-provided’ school – a partnership between the local authority (which oversaw the education of the children) and the Trust (which funded, designed and constructed the buildings). New Earswick Elementary more »< Read More...

New Earswick

The foundations of a Garden Village were laid down by Joseph Rowntree in 1901 when he acquired 123 acres of land near the village of Earswick outside York. In 1902, he commissioned the established partnership of Barry Parker and Raymond Unwin to become the architects for the village of New Earswick. Experimental building more »< Read More...

Lady Peckett’s Yard

Originally a medieval alley (called Bacusgail/then Bakehouse Lane), which passes down the side of the original Rowntree grocery business on Pavement. The alley has had its present name since the 18th century, when John Peckett was Lord Mayor and a house on the site was lived in by his widow. At one time more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Theatre

Joseph Rowntree Theatre was designed by the architect Barry Parker (who also designed part of New Earswick), and built in 1935. Mr Peter Rowntree was one of the Trustees of the firm responsible for its construction and is understood to have spent much time and care in making it one of the most more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree (1836-1925)

Grocer, cocoa and chocolate manufacturer, social reformer, and philanthropist. He was born at Pavement, in York 24 May 1836. He was the second of the three sons (there was one surviving daughter) of Joseph Rowntree and Sarah Stephenson.  He was educated at Bootham School, where he developed a love of natural history and more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree (Senior) (1801-1859)

Youth in Scarborough Grocer and tea dealer, was born in Scarborough the youngest of three sons of John Rowntree and Elizabeth (née Lotherington). He was educated at two day schools in Scarborough, his parents not being in a position to send him to the Quaker Ackworth School. By the age of 13 he more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust

When it was established in 1904 the JRCT was a family-based trust, the trustees being the founder and five relatives. Seebohm Rowntree continued as a trustee until his death in 1954 and the family connection was not broken until the retirement of Michael Rowntree in 1991. The JRCT also flourished within the wider more »< Read More...

John Wilhelm Rowntree

Eldest son of Joseph Rowntree. He had an international outlook for the Rowntree & Co business bringing new ideas concerning the exploitation of new markets and international business strategies. Even more importantly, he is widely regarded as the father of a new branch of ‘Liberal’ Quakerism, together with the American Quaker Rufus Jones. more »< Read More...

Irish immigration in York

Victims of the potato famine fled to escape starvation in their homeland. In the 1840s York’s population of Irish increased from 500 to 2000, coming as they did on the direct railway lines across the Pennines from Liverpool.  Most lived in the poorer crowded areas around Walmgate, Bedern and Minster Yard. With the more »< Read More...

Ireland, the great hunger

In 1850, during his schooldays, Joseph Rowntree Senior took his two elder sons John and Joseph, together with their headmaster, John Ford (1801-1875) on a three-week visit to Ireland. Though the worst of the famine was over, and though it was presented as a botanical expedition, none in the party can have been more »< Read More...