Archives

York’s history

University of York

In 1960 the Rowntree trusts jointly made a grant of £100,000 towards the foundation of the University of York. Several directors and trustees have over the years held positions of responsibility in the University, which has a building in Social Sciences named after Seebohm Rowntr Read More...

Soup Kitchen

Joseph Rowntree Senior was involved in the setting up of the York Soup Kitchen, situated somewhere in the vicinity of Lady Peckett’s Yard, in the hard winter of 1845-46. He became closely involved in the technical arrangements and practical details, such as the steam boiling equipment, the best recipes to use, distribution etc. When more »< Read More...

Rowntree Wharf

Rowntree Wharf, consisting of five stories and a nine-storey water tower, is probably York’s best industrial building. Originally one of the largest flour mills in Europe, it was founded by Henry Leetham in 1860. The building, designed by Walter Penty, was situated between the river Foss and Wormald’s cut, towering over the slum more »< Read More...

Rowntree Park

The park, 25 acres situated on the river Ouse, between Clementhorpe Beck on the west side and Terry Avenue on the east, was a major gift donated by Joseph Rowntree in 1921 as a memorial to the members of the Cocoa Works’ staff who fell in WW1, to be (in his words) a more »< Read More...

Quakerism (The Society of Friends) in York

York has a longstanding Quaker tradition that starts with George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, who was thrown out of York Minster in 1651 for preaching against the established church. The Quakers shunned outward forms of ritual, sacrament, oath-taking, and formulaic prayer; their faith saw the voice of God as more »< Read More...

Pubs in York in the 19th century

Seebohm Rowntree’s work on Poverty contains a map showing the concentration of the public houses of York. References Hugh Murray, A Directory of York Pubs 1455-20 Read More...

Public Health in York

The fast population growth of the mid 19th century led to an expansion of the slum areas and the inadequate sewage system led to outbreaks of plague and disease. ‘Night soil’ (sewage) was dug into holes in back-yard ‘privies’ that were regularly used by more than one household, and in some slums, a more »< Read More...

Poverty in York

Seebohm Rowntree showed that 27.8% of the people in York were living below the poverty line in 1900. Of these 9.91% lived in primary poverty, and 17.78% in secondary poverty. He showed further that poverty was a cycle, and that the poor were not necessarily to blame for their conditions of poverty. Seebohm’s more »< Read More...

Politics in York

Though the Liberal party had made a big impact in the city in the 19th century, this was not to continue into the 20th century. The Labour Party emerged in the 1890s, but had no real triumphs either in local or parliamentary elections. By 1906 there were 31 ‘Independents’, 13 ‘Progressives’ and 4 more »< Read More...

Oscar Rowntree (1879-1947)

Oscar was the youngest of Joseph Rowntree’s four sons and, like his brothers, he worked in the family business.   He was for many years active in the Liberal Party and served on York City Council, taking a strong interest in social affairs. Director and farmer Oscar was a director of Rowntree & Co more »< Read More...