Archives

York’s history

Pavement

Click here to see our illustrated travelling exhibition timeline history of 28 Pavement The location in York of Joseph Rowntree’s (Senior) (1801-1859) original grocer’s shop at 28 Pavement, York, where many apprentices lived and worked, including George Cadbury. Purchased in 1822, it was also the birthplace of all the Rowntree boys, John, Joseph, and more »< Read More...

Tukes, The

The Tukes were a very important Quaker family in the history of chocolate in York and in the wider context of social reform and philanthropy. Mary Tuke set up a shop in Walmgate, York, which is arguably the beginning of the Rowntree factory. William Tuke (1732-1822), along with his son, Henry (1755-1814), and grandson, Samuel (1784-1857), more »< Read More...

John Ford

In January 1829, John Ford (1801-1875) became the second headmaster (or Superintendent of the Establishment) of Bootham School. Up until that point the school had been run as a private concern, but with the introduction of John Ford the school changed to the Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting Boys’ School, which would remain the official more »< Read More...

William Tuke

William Tuke (1732-1822), born in York, moved into the family tea and coffee merchant business established by Mary Tuke in 1725, which she then passed on to him in 1755. It would later become part of the Twinings tea company. After the death of Hannah Mills in York Lunatic Asylum, William Tuke was more »< Read More...

Samuel Tuke

Samuel Tuke (1784-1857), born in York, was the grandson of Henry Tuke, and son of William Tuke, who together both founded The Retreat in York in 1796. Samuel Tuke continued the work of his grandfather and father, helping to publicise the term ‘moral treatment’, and the work being carried out at The Retreat, in more »< Read More...

Thomas Craven

Thomas Craven (1817-1862), the son of an East Riding farmer, arrived in York as a 16 year old apprentice in 1833 to work with his brother-in-law Thomas Hide at his confectionery business. After the death of his brother-in-law, Craven set up his own confectionery business at High Ousegate. In 1851 he married Mary Ann more »< Read More...

Joseph Terry

Sir Joseph Terry (1828-1898) was an English industrialist born in York. Educated at St. Peter’s School, York, he took over his father’s confectionery business with his two brothers in 1854. The business was incorporated as Joseph Terry and Sons Ltd. in 1895. Sir Joseph Terry served as the Lord Mayor of York on more »< Read More...

Mount School, The

The Mount School was founded in 1785 in Trinity Lane. In 1831 it was established as the York Friends’ Girls’ School after a move to Castlegate, and in 1857 the school relocated to its present location on Dalton Terrace, on the outskirts of the York. Its pupils have included the daughters of many more »< Read More...

Conscientious objectors, York and

A good source of information about this subject is found in the archives at Bootham School. World War I Before WW1 between half and three-quarters of the pupils were connected with the Society of Friends in some way.  The number of boys attending the school did not reach 100 until 1918. Contrary to more »< Read More...

Yearsley Swimming Baths

The “New Yearsley Baths” was opened on May 4th 1909 by the Right Honourable Alderman James Birch, Lord Mayor of York. Originally the company swimming baths, it was designed by Fred Rowntree in 1908 at a cost approaching £3,000. The original design held 226,890 gallons of water and measured 144 feet long by 51 feet more »< Read More...