Archives

Social history

Temperance Movement

The Temperance Society was first founded in Bradford. Joseph Rowntree and his father wrote widely on temperance and opposed the consumption of alcohol, which they called ‘the drink misery’, although they acknowledged the reasons why people drank alcohol. Joseph Rowntree wrote The Temperance Problem and Social Reform (1899). Another work, The British Gothenburg more »< Read More...

Statistics, Rowntrees’ use of

Joseph Rowntree (Senior) was ‘much at home in figures, partial to statistical research’ and had a ‘microscopic power of perceiving and mastering details’. For example in 1843, wishing to modernise the curriculum at Ackworth School, he first made a survey of the career choices of a sample of the pupils. For his son more »< Read More...

Soup Kitchen

Joseph Rowntree Senior was involved in the setting up of the York Soup Kitchen, situated somewhere in the vicinity of Lady Peckett’s Yard, in the hard winter of 1845-46. He became closely involved in the technical arrangements and practical details, such as the steam boiling equipment, the best recipes to use, distribution etc. When more »< Read More...

Retreat, The

The Retreat was founded in 1792 and opened in 1796 by William Tuke. It was established initially to provide a place where Quakers who were mentally ill could be treated with respect and dignity. The first buildings were designed and built 1794, and include the work of several of the foremost architects of more »< Read More...

Quakers and Education

From its beginnings the Society of Friends always saw the importance of education, and as early as 1695, the London Yearly Meeting recommended that: ‘schools and schoolmasters who are faithful Friends, and well qualified, be placed and encouraged in all counties, cities, great towns, or places where there may be need. And that such more »< Read More...

Poverty in York

Seebohm Rowntree showed that 27.8% of the people in York were living below the poverty line in 1900. Of these 9.91% lived in primary poverty, and 17.78% in secondary poverty. He showed further that poverty was a cycle, and that the poor were not necessarily to blame for their conditions of poverty. Seebohm’s more »< Read More...

Poverty Line

One of the first to define this commonly used term still today was Seebohm Rowntree. It denotes the minimum standard of necessities for life (fuel, lighting, rent etc) plus a calorific intake. External Links http://www.jrf.org.uk/sites/files/jrf/1859352227. Read More...

Lloyd George, David, and Seebohm Rowntree

‘In the organisation of the welfare boards of our new factories we had the valuable direction of Mr Seebohm Rowntree, who is not only a highly successful man of business but a student of social conditions of worldwide fame… Mr Rowntree is well known not only as a great employer of labour, but more »< Read More...

Lady Peckett’s Yard

Originally a medieval alley (called Bacusgail/then Bakehouse Lane), which passes down the side of the original Rowntree grocery business on Pavement. The alley has had its present name since the 18th century, when John Peckett was Lord Mayor and a house on the site was lived in by his widow. At one time more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Memorial Library, Haxby Road

Joseph Rowntree started a library for employees in 1885 by donating £10 of his own money, raising £10 from another source, and docking a penny a week from workers’ pay. The Memorial Library was planned after Joseph’s death in 1925 and was opened in 1927.  The library, a Grade II listed Arts and Crafts more »< Read More...