Archives

Rowntree Family History

Quakerism (The Society of Friends) in York

York has a longstanding Quaker tradition that starts with George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, who was thrown out of York Minster in 1651 for preaching against the established church. The Quakers shunned outward forms of ritual, sacrament, oath-taking, and formulaic prayer; their faith saw the voice of God as more »< Read More...

Quakers, Rowntrees as (i.e. contribution towards Society of Friends nationally)

The Rowntrees’ life and work is informed by their Quaker faith, which is seen especially in a sense of quiet service, public responsibility, civic pride, pragmatism and trustworthiness. Joseph Rowntree (Senior) was instinctively attracted to the growing evangelical spirit amongst Quakers in the early 19th century, and found the quietist views prevalent in more »< Read More...

Quaker Burial Ground, Cromwell Road, Bishophill

This piece of land was purchased in 1667 and used as the first burial ground in York for Quakers. John Woolman (friend of Benjamin Franklin and early advocate of the abolition of slavery) is buried there, as are some of the Tukes, and Lindley Murray, the grammarian. Now a serene garden with lime more »< Read More...

Philanthropy, Joseph Rowntree and

The following quotations, some of them from the famous 1904 Memorandum written as guidance to trustees when he was setting up the trusts, gives a flavour of Joseph Rowntree’s ideas on philanthropy: ‘I feel that much of the current philanthropic effort is directed to remedying the more superficial manifestations of weakness or evil, more »< Read More...

Penn (Top) House

This historic building was in Rowntree hands for nearly 70 years, and referred to in Rowntree correspondence as ’38 St Mary’s’. Colloquially it was known as ‘Top House’ (to indicate its situation at the top of St Mary’s and on the corner of Bootham). Joseph Rowntree (Senior) bought the land from the London more »< Read More...

Ouse Lea, Shipton Road

The name of the original house, home of Joseph Rowntree’s daughter Agnes (1870-1961) who married the Haxby Road cocoa works doctor, Peter MacDonald. Originally, a large red brick house Ouse Lea, it lies adjacent to Homestead Park. It was demolished by the Joseph Rowntree Memorial Trust in 1961 in order to build the more »< Read More...

Oscar Rowntree (1879-1947)

Oscar was the youngest of Joseph Rowntree’s four sons and, like his brothers, he worked in the family business.   He was for many years active in the Liberal Party and served on York City Council, taking a strong interest in social affairs. Director and farmer Oscar was a director of Rowntree & Co more »< Read More...

New Earswick

The foundations of a Garden Village were laid down by Joseph Rowntree in 1901 when he acquired 123 acres of land near the village of Earswick outside York. In 1902, he commissioned the established partnership of Barry Parker and Raymond Unwin to become the architects for the village of New Earswick. Experimental building more »< Read More...

Mary Tuke

The Rowntree factory strictly has its origins in the shop in Walmgate that was established by the Quaker Mary Tuke in 1725. She successfully rebelled against trading restrictions of the Merchant Adventurers Company which has become a classic case in company history. Her nephew William joined her as an apprentice and took over more »< Read More...

Lawrence Rowntree

Joseph Rowntree’s grandson, son of John Wilhelm, Lawrence Rowntree fell in action in World War I; the York Casualty Roll of Honour records as follows: ‘Rowntree, Lawrence Edmund 
Second Lieutenant ‘A’ Bty. 26th Bde., Royal Field Artillery. Killed in action 25th November 1917. Aged 22. Son of Constance Margaret Rowntree, of Low Hall, Scalby, more »< Read More...