Archives

Quaker history

New Earswick

The foundations of a Garden Village were laid down by Joseph Rowntree in 1901 when he acquired 123 acres of land near the village of Earswick outside York. In 1902, he commissioned the established partnership of Barry Parker and Raymond Unwin to become the architects for the village of New Earswick. Experimental building more »< Read More...

Mary Tuke

The Rowntree factory strictly has its origins in the shop in Walmgate that was established by the Quaker Mary Tuke in 1725. She successfully rebelled against trading restrictions of the Merchant Adventurers Company which has become a classic case in company history. Her nephew William joined her as an apprentice and took over more »< Read More...

Leisure pursuits

Part of the Quaker educational approach was the belief in the development, physically, spiritually and morally, of the whole person, and this meant the useful pursuit of leisure time in order to improve the well-being of the person. The Adult School Movement played a role in encouraging a range of activities beyond the more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust

The Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust Limited was founded (as the Joseph Rowntree Social Service Trust Ltd) in 1904 by Joseph Rowntree.  He created the Trust as a tax-paying company in order to advance the non-charitable aspects of his vision of society, with the aim of “influencing public thought in right channels” and ensuring more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Foundation

Established in 1904 as the Joseph Rowntree Village Trust, to alleviate the conditions of working people by providing improved housing. The endowment to the JRVT comprised the New Earswick garden village properties, and shares in Rowntree & Co to a total value of £62,165 (24% of which was the property value). First name more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree (1836-1925)

Grocer, cocoa and chocolate manufacturer, social reformer, and philanthropist. He was born at Pavement, in York 24 May 1836. He was the second of the three sons (there was one surviving daughter) of Joseph Rowntree and Sarah Stephenson.  He was educated at Bootham School, where he developed a love of natural history and more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree (Senior) (1801-1859)

Youth in Scarborough Grocer and tea dealer, was born in Scarborough the youngest of three sons of John Rowntree and Elizabeth (née Lotherington). He was educated at two day schools in Scarborough, his parents not being in a position to send him to the Quaker Ackworth School. By the age of 13 he more »< Read More...

Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust

When it was established in 1904 the JRCT was a family-based trust, the trustees being the founder and five relatives. Seebohm Rowntree continued as a trustee until his death in 1954 and the family connection was not broken until the retirement of Michael Rowntree in 1991. The JRCT also flourished within the wider more »< Read More...

John Wilhelm Rowntree

Eldest son of Joseph Rowntree. He had an international outlook for the Rowntree & Co business bringing new ideas concerning the exploitation of new markets and international business strategies. Even more importantly, he is widely regarded as the father of a new branch of ‘Liberal’ Quakerism, together with the American Quaker Rufus Jones. more »< Read More...

Friends’ Meeting House, Friargate, York

The Friends Meeting House in Friargate was first built in 1674 and has undergone several redevelopments since it was first built. At its height it had a gallery and could accommodate up to 1200 people, a sign of the importance of Quakerism in York at the time. Joseph Rowntree is known to have more »< Read More...