Archives

Confectionery history

Dunollie Rest House, Scarborough

A  convalesce house in Filey Road Scarborough that was bought by the Rowntree company out of profits from its reserves from the company’s Military and National Service Allowances Scheme. History Dunollie was originally a private home and was later used as a private hotel in the 1910s venue “ideal for rest and quiet recreation” more »< Read More...

Dairy Box

Dairy Box was launched in 1936, with early advertising including the slogan: ‘She’ll love it if you bring her chocolates, She’ll love you if they’re Dairy Box’. All sweets used to be placed in the box by hand at a rate of about 80 per person per minu Read More...

Company Management, Enlightened

The Rowntree company was a known to be a pioneer for business models and ‘enlightened’ company management. For the practical comforts of the workforce, in 1885, when the business was barely surviving, Joseph Rowntree used his own money to start a library for his employees, deducting a penny a week from their wages more »< Read More...

Confectionery industry in York, history of

The confectionery and cocoa processing industry were a key part of York’s economy in the 19th century. Joseph Terry was established in 1838; first in confectionery, then in candied peel, and Thomas Craven produced sugar confectionery in York.  One of the 31 tea dealers in the city, Samuel Tuke, had begun to trade more »< Read More...

Cocoa Works Magazine

‘A Journal in the interests of employees of Rowntree & Co Ltd, York’, started in 1902, and continued until 1969, going through several editorial transformations that reflect the varying fortunes of the company’s history.  It was conceived by Joseph Rowntree as a means of maintaining communication between workforce and management at a time more »< Read More...

Cober Hill, Scarborough

John Wilhelm Rowntree had the idea of developing a centre where people working in education, social service, and other voluntary and charitable activity could gather for residential courses and conferences. His cousin Arnold Rowntree brought that vision to fulfilment by the purchase in 1920 of a splendid Victorian mansion in Cloughton, Cober Hill, more »< Read More...

Claude Gaget

A French confectioner who introduced gums and pastilles (up to that point an exclusively French product) at the Rowntree company, and was a key contributor to the Rowntree fortunes in its early years. Joseph and Henry Isaac Rowntree’s conservative attitude to product development meant they were losing out to Cadbury’s in the 1870s. more »< Read More...

Cadbury/Fry, Rowntree and

The fortunes of the three major British confectionery companies started in the 19th century were interlocking for much of their history. Their commercial relationships were underpinned by a strong family unity and inter-marriage, linked by their Quaker faith that united them in national affairs. During the later years of the First World War, more »< Read More...

Brand, the importance of

Ironically for a company that would become a world leader in branding, in the early years, the Rowntree family thought that quality products should and would sell themselves. But a gradual recognition of the need to have a strong marketing campaign and the development of outstanding brands such as Black Magic and After more »< Read More...

Black Magic

Launched in 1933, this successful line had a difficult start through the war years when production had to be radically scaled back. It was relaunched in 1947 as a gift box that emphasised romance, sophistication and courtship: rather than being branded with the Rowntree name, the brand name itself carried and marketed the more »< Read More...