Archives

July, 2013

John Woolman

John Woolman (1720-1772) was a North American itinerant Quaker preacher and early abolitionist. He came to England in 1772 to garner Quaker support for the abolition of slavery. He is buried in the Quaker Burial Ground on Cromwell Road. External Links http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wool Read More...

Friends Provident Institution

Founded in 1832 in Bradford by Joseph Rowntree and Samuel Tuke as the Friends Provident Institution, a friendly society for members of the Religious Society of Friends, it continues to this day with the name Friends Life. In 1845 it became a mutual life assurance company. Today there is no formal link between more »< Read More...

Theodore Hotham Rowntree

Theodore Hotham Rowntree (1867-1949) joined the firm in 1891, undertaking accounting and statistical work, and became the first Company Secretary from 1897 to 1924. He was also Liberal Councillor for Bootham on York Council from 1912 to 1919. He was the nephew of Joseph Rowntr Read More...

John Bowes Morrell

John Bowes Morrell (1873-1963) joined Rowntree’s Cocoa Works at age 17, an apprenticeship set up by his father, William Morrell, at the same time as a loan of £10,000 from the County Bank to finance the move of the factory to Haxby Road. He became Director at age 25. He also helped found more »< Read More...

Elect Cocoa, Rowntree’s

For a teetotal Quaker, chocolate drinks were promoted as an alternative to alcohol for the working man. Developed in 1887 and marketed as, “More than a drink, a food”, Rowntree’s Elect Cocoa proved very popular up until the years preceding the Great War, and was eventually trimmed from the list of products by George more »< Read More...

Pavement

Click here to see our illustrated travelling exhibition timeline history of 28 Pavement The location in York of Joseph Rowntree’s (Senior) (1801-1859) original grocer’s shop at 28 Pavement, York, where many apprentices lived and worked, including George Cadbury. Purchased in 1822, it was also the birthplace of all the Rowntree boys, John, Joseph, and more »< Read More...

Tukes, The

The Tukes were a very important Quaker family in the history of chocolate in York and in the wider context of social reform and philanthropy. Mary Tuke set up a shop in Walmgate, York, which is arguably the beginning of the Rowntree factory. William Tuke (1732-1822), along with his son, Henry (1755-1814), and grandson, Samuel (1784-1857), more »< Read More...

George Cadbury

George Cadbury (1839-1922) was the third son of John Cadbury, who, with his brother Richard, took over the family business in 1861 from his father, after the death of his mother that year. Primarily concerned with his workers’ welfare, but also out of the need to find more space for the rapidly expanding more »< Read More...

John Ford

In January 1829, John Ford (1801-1875) became the second headmaster (or Superintendent of the Establishment) of Bootham School. Up until that point the school had been run as a private concern, but with the introduction of John Ford the school changed to the Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting Boys’ School, which would remain the official more »< Read More...

William Tuke

William Tuke (1732-1822), born in York, moved into the family tea and coffee merchant business established by Mary Tuke in 1725, which she then passed on to him in 1755. It would later become part of the Twinings tea company. After the death of Hannah Mills in York Lunatic Asylum, William Tuke was more »< Read More...