Archives

February, 2013

Pubs in York in the 19th century

Seebohm Rowntree’s work on Poverty contains a map showing the concentration of the public houses of York. References Hugh Murray, A Directory of York Pubs 1455-20 Read More...

Quakers in the 18th – 19th century

Although in the mid 18th century Quakers had numbered around 40,000, that number had halved a century later, although the 1860s marked the beginnings of a revival. The reasons for the decline are not difficult to understand at a time when it was necessary to travel long distances for silent meetings, when there more »< Read More...

Quaker Burial Ground, Cromwell Road, Bishophill

This piece of land was purchased in 1667 and used as the first burial ground in York for Quakers. John Woolman (friend of Benjamin Franklin and early advocate of the abolition of slavery) is buried there, as are some of the Tukes, and Lindley Murray, the grammarian. Now a serene garden with lime more »< Read More...

Public Health in York

The fast population growth of the mid 19th century led to an expansion of the slum areas and the inadequate sewage system led to outbreaks of plague and disease. ‘Night soil’ (sewage) was dug into holes in back-yard ‘privies’ that were regularly used by more than one household, and in some slums, a more »< Read More...

Poverty in York

Seebohm Rowntree showed that 27.8% of the people in York were living below the poverty line in 1900. Of these 9.91% lived in primary poverty, and 17.78% in secondary poverty. He showed further that poverty was a cycle, and that the poor were not necessarily to blame for their conditions of poverty. Seebohm’s more »< Read More...

Poverty Line

One of the first to define this commonly used term still today was Seebohm Rowntree. It denotes the minimum standard of necessities for life (fuel, lighting, rent etc) plus a calorific intake. External Links http://www.jrf.org.uk/sites/files/jrf/1859352227. Read More...

Politics in York

Though the Liberal party had made a big impact in the city in the 19th century, this was not to continue into the 20th century. The Labour Party emerged in the 1890s, but had no real triumphs either in local or parliamentary elections. By 1906 there were 31 ‘Independents’, 13 ‘Progressives’ and 4 more »< Read More...

Philanthropy, Joseph Rowntree and

The following quotations, some of them from the famous 1904 Memorandum written as guidance to trustees when he was setting up the trusts, gives a flavour of Joseph Rowntree’s ideas on philanthropy: ‘I feel that much of the current philanthropic effort is directed to remedying the more superficial manifestations of weakness or evil, more »< Read More...

Penn (Top) House

This historic building was in Rowntree hands for nearly 70 years, and referred to in Rowntree correspondence as ’38 St Mary’s’. Colloquially it was known as ‘Top House’ (to indicate its situation at the top of St Mary’s and on the corner of Bootham). Joseph Rowntree (Senior) bought the land from the London more »< Read More...

Ouse Lea, Shipton Road

The name of the original house, home of Joseph Rowntree’s daughter Agnes (1870-1961) who married the Haxby Road cocoa works doctor, Peter MacDonald. Originally, a large red brick house Ouse Lea, it lies adjacent to Homestead Park. It was demolished by the Joseph Rowntree Memorial Trust in 1961 in order to build the more »< Read More...