Archives

February, 2013

Sarah (née Stephenson) Rowntree

Sarah Rowntree, née Stephenson, was born in Stockton-on-Tees in 1807, the youngest child of Quaker parents, Isaac and Hannah Stephenson. Her parents moved from Stockton-upon-Tees to Manchester; and her father died unexpectedly in 1828. Three years later she met Joseph Rowntree, and in April 1831 he wrote to declare his feelings for her, more »< Read More...

Rowntree Wharf

Rowntree Wharf, consisting of five stories and a nine-storey water tower, is probably York’s best industrial building. Originally one of the largest flour mills in Europe, it was founded by Henry Leetham in 1860. The building, designed by Walter Penty, was situated between the river Foss and Wormald’s cut, towering over the slum more »< Read More...

Rowntree Society, The

Founded by Steven Burkeman in 2001 at a time when it looked as though the Rowntree inheritance was in danger of disappearing altogether from York (apart, of course, from the work of the Joseph Rowntree trusts).  With the support of Hugh Bayley MP, he put together a small group of people, including Mark more »< Read More...

Rowntree Park

The park, 25 acres situated on the river Ouse, between Clementhorpe Beck on the west side and Terry Avenue on the east, was a major gift donated by Joseph Rowntree in 1921 as a memorial to the members of the Cocoa Works’ staff who fell in WW1, to be (in his words) a more »< Read More...

Rowntree Company Chairmen after Joseph Rowntree

1923 Seebohm Rowntree 1941 George Harris 1952 William Wallace 1957 Lloyd Owen 1966 Donald Barron 1981 Kenneth Di Read More...

Richard Rowntree (1921-1997) Director 1964-1994

Youngest son of Arnold Rowntree. He was active in politics, serving as a County Councillor and standing as a Liberal candidate for Parliament twice. A conscientious objector during the war, like his brother Michael, he served in the Friends Ambulance Unit which his father, Arnold, had helped set up in the previous war, more »< Read More...

Retreat, The

The Retreat was founded in 1792 and opened in 1796 by William Tuke. It was established initially to provide a place where Quakers who were mentally ill could be treated with respect and dignity. The first buildings were designed and built 1794, and include the work of several of the foremost architects of more »< Read More...

Quakerism (The Society of Friends) in York

York has a longstanding Quaker tradition that starts with George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, who was thrown out of York Minster in 1651 for preaching against the established church. The Quakers shunned outward forms of ritual, sacrament, oath-taking, and formulaic prayer; their faith saw the voice of God as more »< Read More...

Quakers and Education

From its beginnings the Society of Friends always saw the importance of education, and as early as 1695, the London Yearly Meeting recommended that: ‘schools and schoolmasters who are faithful Friends, and well qualified, be placed and encouraged in all counties, cities, great towns, or places where there may be need. And that such more »< Read More...

Quakers, Rowntrees as (i.e. contribution towards Society of Friends nationally)

The Rowntrees’ life and work is informed by their Quaker faith, which is seen especially in a sense of quiet service, public responsibility, civic pride, pragmatism and trustworthiness. Joseph Rowntree (Senior) was instinctively attracted to the growing evangelical spirit amongst Quakers in the early 19th century, and found the quietist views prevalent in more »< Read More...