Archives

Quaker history

John Bright

John Bright (1811-1889), born in Rochdale, Lancashire was a liberal statesmen and a strong critic of British Foreign Policy. He spent two years at Bootham School, where the library is named after him. A great orator, together with Richard Cobden, he was a key advocate in the campaign to have the Corn Laws repealed. more »< Read More...

George Fox

George Fox (1624-1691) was a founder of the Religious Society of Friends. He rebelled against the prescriptive religious and political authorities and went to London in 1643 in a state of mental confusion, from which he found solace in the Bible. Over the next few years ox travelled around the country engaging clergy more »< Read More...

John Woolman

John Woolman (1720-1772) was a North American itinerant Quaker preacher and early abolitionist. He came to England in 1772 to garner Quaker support for the abolition of slavery. He is buried in the Quaker Burial Ground on Cromwell Road. External Links http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wool Read More...

Friends Provident Institution

Founded in 1832 in Bradford by Joseph Rowntree and Samuel Tuke as the Friends Provident Institution, a friendly society for members of the Religious Society of Friends, it continues to this day with the name Friends Life. In 1845 it became a mutual life assurance company. Today there is no formal link between more »< Read More...

Tukes, The

The Tukes were a very important Quaker family in the history of chocolate in York and in the wider context of social reform and philanthropy. Mary Tuke set up a shop in Walmgate, York, which is arguably the beginning of the Rowntree factory. William Tuke (1732-1822), along with his son, Henry (1755-1814), and grandson, Samuel (1784-1857), more »< Read More...

George Cadbury

George Cadbury (1839-1922) was the third son of John Cadbury, who, with his brother Richard, took over the family business in 1861 from his father, after the death of his mother that year. Primarily concerned with his workers’ welfare, but also out of the need to find more space for the rapidly expanding more »< Read More...

John Ford

In January 1829, John Ford (1801-1875) became the second headmaster (or Superintendent of the Establishment) of Bootham School. Up until that point the school had been run as a private concern, but with the introduction of John Ford the school changed to the Yorkshire Quarterly Meeting Boys’ School, which would remain the official more »< Read More...

William Tuke

William Tuke (1732-1822), born in York, moved into the family tea and coffee merchant business established by Mary Tuke in 1725, which she then passed on to him in 1755. It would later become part of the Twinings tea company. After the death of Hannah Mills in York Lunatic Asylum, William Tuke was more »< Read More...

Samuel Tuke

Samuel Tuke (1784-1857), born in York, was the grandson of Henry Tuke, and son of William Tuke, who together both founded The Retreat in York in 1796. Samuel Tuke continued the work of his grandfather and father, helping to publicise the term ‘moral treatment’, and the work being carried out at The Retreat, in more »< Read More...

Friends’ Ambulance Unit

The Friends’ Ambulance Unit was a volunteer ambulance service set up by the Society of Friends in 1914 to help provide opportunities for service for young male Friends during the First World War. In line with the Quaker Peace Testimony, it was mainly staffed by registered conscientious objectors. First World War Overall it more »< Read More...