Archives

February, 2013

Yearsley Swimming Baths

The “New Yearsley Baths” was opened on May 4th 1909 by the Right Honourable Alderman James Birch, Lord Mayor of York. Originally the company swimming baths, it was designed by Fred Rowntree in 1908 at a cost approaching £3,000. The original design held 226,890 gallons of water and measured 144 feet long by 51 feet more »< Read More...

Women at Rowntrees

The employment situation in York was unusual in the industrial period, as the railways employed the males, while female labour was provided by the confectionery industry. References Emma Robertson, Chocolate, Women, and Empire: a Social and Cultural History. MUP 20 Read More...

Winston Churchill on Seebohm Rowntree’s work

On reading Seebohm Rowntree’s book on Poverty in York, Winston Churchill (then a Liberal MP and social reformer of David Lloyd George’s government) said to an audience in Blackpool in 1902: ‘I have been reading a book which has fairly made my hair stand on end, written by a Mr Rowntree, who deals more »< Read More...

USA, Rowntrees and

The attention to foreign developments demonstrated by family members of the Rowntree clan is seen in the social studies conducted by Joseph and Seebohm Rowntree. For his study The Temperance Problem and Social Reform, conducted with Arthur Shewell and first published in 1899, Joseph surveyed the alcohol policies in different countries, including the more »< Read More...

University of York

In 1960 the Rowntree trusts jointly made a grant of £100,000 towards the foundation of the University of York. Several directors and trustees have over the years held positions of responsibility in the University, which has a building in Social Sciences named after Seebohm Rowntr Read More...

Temperance Movement

The Temperance Society was first founded in Bradford. Joseph Rowntree and his father wrote widely on temperance and opposed the consumption of alcohol, which they called ‘the drink misery’, although they acknowledged the reasons why people drank alcohol. Joseph Rowntree wrote The Temperance Problem and Social Reform (1899). Another work, The British Gothenburg more »< Read More...

Tanner’s Moat

The Rowntree & Co. had moved to Tanner’s Moat by 1864, then an old iron foundry, with several cottages and a tavern beside the river. Henry Isaac was the director until his premature death in 1883, and a few years after Joseph had joined him to develop the busine Read More...

Statistics, Rowntrees’ use of

Joseph Rowntree (Senior) was ‘much at home in figures, partial to statistical research’ and had a ‘microscopic power of perceiving and mastering details’. For example in 1843, wishing to modernise the curriculum at Ackworth School, he first made a survey of the career choices of a sample of the pupils. For his son more »< Read More...

Soup Kitchen

Joseph Rowntree Senior was involved in the setting up of the York Soup Kitchen, situated somewhere in the vicinity of Lady Peckett’s Yard, in the hard winter of 1845-46. He became closely involved in the technical arrangements and practical details, such as the steam boiling equipment, the best recipes to use, distribution etc. When more »< Read More...

Seebohm – origins of the name

According to Christian Gierloff, a Norwegian economist of note and long-time friend of Seebohm Rowntree‘s, the name is a hybrid surname of Swedish-German origin (Sjöbohm), possibly going back to the 17th century. The Seebohm family were from Bad Pyrmont in Lower Saxony, and some moved to Hitchin, Hertfordshire. Seebohm is the surname of more »< Read More...